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SOUNDLOVE


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SOUNDLOVE


 
 

Welcome to Soundlove

We invite you to join us in a journey of sound.  Our joy in this now is to share our beautiful instruments with all of our beloved friends, old and new. 

We hold regular Sound Bath EVENTS in beautiful spaces and can create soundFOR YOU in your space, with your friends, colleagues and communities

Gongs, Gemstone blended quartz singing bowls, solfeggio tuning forks, Koshi chimes, crystal pyramids, Tibetan bowls and bells. The interwoven sounds harmonise the chakras, sooth nervous system, increase alpha brain waves, decrease blood pressure, heart rate, respiration and stress hormones whilst taking you on a journey in sound and peace.

Immerse, revitalise, re-energise and relax, mentally emotionally and physically.

A place of sweetness, of gentle yet powerful mystery where sound speaks in a circular language, whispering truth deep into our cells.  We hear not only with our ears but with our whole being,  harmonising with nature and the divine song that is creation.  

Please do get in touch for more information, to book your space at one of our events or to request that we come to you.

G&G

 

 

 

 
 
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G&G


G&G


Photography by Stephanie Chappell 

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The Yurt


The Yurt


The original word for “nomad” came from a word for felt, making the nomads “felt people”. These felt people called their circular, lattice-walled shelters “home,” ger (rhymes with “air”) or uy (oo-ee) which today helps us define what is a yurt.

For Mongolians, the ger is more than their traveling shelter on the Asian steppes; it is their centering point in a moving universe. The internal floor plan of the ger is based on the four directions, much like the Native American Medicine Wheel or the Navajo hogan. The door always opens to the south. Opposite the door, sacred space is to the North. If the family is Buddhist, this is where the altar sits. It is also the place of the seat of honor for guests.

Yin and yang, ancient symbols for feminine and masculine and the balance of life, hold space to the east and west. The western half of the ger is the male area and the eastern half, the female domain. Men’s possessions (riding tack, hunting gear, and whiskey) are hung on the western wall sections. Men and male guests usually sit on this side. Women’s tools, such as pots and pans and looms and felting equipment, are stored on the east side of the ger, where women, children and female guests usually sit. One proceeds around the ger in a clockwise or “sunwise” direction.

In the ancient Shamanist tradition, it is the ger that holds the balance and flow of yin and yang, and of worlds above and below. All of this is centered around the sacred fire, entryway to the sacred world below and provider of warmth and light and the smoke that rises to the world above. In this way the ger expresses the balance of all things in the one, the circle.


by becky kemery, author of YURTS: Living in the Round